Tuesday, 19 October 2021

Why Instagram, Facebook, and WhatsApp were down globally

Why Instagram, Facebook, and WhatsApp were down globally

Facebook, its messaging platforms WhatsApp and its photo-sharing app Instagram were all hit by an extended outage impacting millions of users globally before being restored after six hrs.

On Monday, Facebook said that it has been working to restoring access to its services and is

"feeling great to report as they are coming online."

The company confessed and thanked its users for bearing with it but did not say what might have produced the outage, which began around 8:45 pm IST and was one of the most extended failures in recent years. Downdetector, which detects internet issues, said the Facebook outage issue was the huge it had seen, with more than 10.6 million worldwide.

Facebook and its messaging platform WhatsApp and its photo-sharing app Instagram were all hit by an extended outage impacting millions of users globally before being restored after six hours.

Why Instagram Facebook and WhatsApp were down globally 1pixabay image

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Shares of Facebook fell 4.9 percent on Monday, their most notable daily drop since last November, and according to admeasurement firm Standard Media Index, Facebook was losing about $545,000 in the US as ad revenue per hour during the outage period.

Some of Facebook's internal apps, including the company's email system, were also hit by an outage issue. Bloomberg reported that Reddit and Twitter users also said that employees at the company's Menlo Park, California, campus could not access offices and conference rooms that required a security badge.

Facebook accepts that "some people are having trouble accessing Facebook app" and said it is working on restoring access but did not detail the reason behind the outage or the number of users affected by the outage issue.

The message on Facebook's webpage shows an error in the (DNS) Domain Name System, which allows web addresses to take users to their destination or converts domain names like "facebook.com" to the actual internet protocol addresses of the corresponding website. According to Wired, an error in DNS can make it impossible to connect to websites.

Several internet infrastructure experts told Wired that the likeliest answer was a misconfiguration on Facebook's part. "It appears that Facebook has done something to their routers, the ones that connect the Facebook network to the rest of the internet," John Graham-Cumming, CTO of internet infrastructure company Cloudflare, said.